Melon

Cultivated in hot, sunny regions, the top melon-producing countries are China, Turkey, Iran and the U.S. We can't think of a better ingredient to pick from the vine and close out the summer than this succulent treasure.

Curtis Stone Maude Melon

Relatives of the cucumber, summer melons include those with a raised cross-hatched pattern or netting on the rind. The Charentais variety is characterized by the green ribs on the rind. Its tender, apricot-orange interior and gorgeous fragrance, make it the perfect dessert melon. Muskmelon are known as cantaloupe in the U.S. Their pale orange flesh is juicy and sweet. The Galia is a honeydew-cantaloupe cross. Spherical and small, the creamy, light green flesh is spicy-sweet. The Ambrosia is a hybrid muskmelon with a highly-perfumed scent, best enjoyed fresh. The popular Spanish variety, Piel de Sapo, has a rough, dark green exterior and crisp flesh and pairs well with salty, smoked meats. And we'd be remiss to exclude the watermelon, the largest of the melons. Barrel-shaped with bright, pink flesh, which can also be yellow or white.

Curtis Stone Maude Melon

When selecting whole, unsliced melons, tap the sides. You should listen for a faintly hollow sound. Press the end opposite the stem; ripe melons will yield easily and should feel heavy for their size. Overripe melons may smell a bit musty. The rind should be thick and unblemished.

Curtis Stone Maude Melon

Little prep is needed to enjoy your melon. If ripe, keep it at room temperature. Ripe melons should be stored in a cool place, even in the refrigerator. Pair with smoked meats, light cheeses, mint, raspberries, and cucumber. Melons sing summer.

Curtis Stone Maude Melon

We hope you can join us in September to experience a tasting menu comprised of classic and modern dishes inspired by melon. Reservations are open.

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